Theological Underpinnings

Unitarian Universalists (UUs) affirm and promote seven principles:

  • The inherent worth and dignity of every person;
  • Justice, equity and compassion in human relations;
  • Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations;
  • A free and responsible search for truth and meaning;
  • The right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within our congregations and in society at large;
  • The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all;
  • Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part.

When you engage with a UU who is working for justice, you will find these principles expressed in both word and action.  That is who we are. 

This topic serves as a one of many places on this site where we speak of our justice work as UUs.  Please join us here.  Read.  Post.  Leave a comment.  Pause to reflect.

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